Category Archives: Getting ready for your rabbit

7 Questions to Answer Before Getting a Rabbit

Getting a rabbit is a great thing to do.

There are so many bunnies out there that need a good home and a good owner to look after them.

So if it has crossed your mind about getting a rabbit then here are some questions that are good to answer to see if they are right for your household.

7 Questions to Answer Before Getting a Rabbit

1. Who will be responsible for the rabbit?

Rabbits are not the best pets for young children to look after. Even if you have older children, don’t forget that they will be the ones responsible for them.

They will need to be committed to feeding and maintaining them each and every day whatever the weather, no matter whether they want to or not.

2. Can you commit to having a rabbit for the long term?

They really are a long term commitment and are capable of living between 8-12 years.

If you are really thinking about getting a rabbit for your older child, then what happens to it when they pack up and leave home?

3. What about the time that rabbits need?

Looking after a rabbit takes time out of your day as they need cleaning out, grooming, feeding not to mention interacting with and playing with.

They aren’t just a pet you can just leave alone in a pen or a hutch. To have a truly happy rabbit, they need time with their owner.

4. Can you afford a rabbit?

Rabbits are not cheap to get and to maintain. T

he costs of maintaining a rabbit are real, from housing them, feeding them, getting them bedding and toys, ensuring they get care during your holidays, vaccinations and neutering.

This is not forgetting that if you get another rabbit as well, the cost of looking after them doubles.

5. Do you have the space for a Rabbit?

Rabbits need space to live and to run around and get exercise. To ensure that they get the space that they need, it will take up a proportion of .

To ensure that they get the space that they need, it will take up a proportion of your home or garden. Are you prepared to sacrifice your space in this way?

6. Are you prepared to sacrifice some of the look of your garden/home?

In addition, their hutch/pen may be unsightly and may not fit into the design aspirations you have for your property. Depending on what kind of hutch/pen you go for, it can impact what kind of ideas you have for your home or garden.

7. What happens to the rabbit when you go on holiday?

Rabbits are not good travellers and its not a good idea to take them on holiday with you. So if this is the case, what happens to them, who will you ask to look after them and are they capable of looking after them for you?

These are questions not designed to scare you, mere just to get you thinking about whether a rabbit is for you. They are amazing pets to have, but they just need the right owner who will look after them well.

5 Characteristics of a Healthy Rabbit

When looking to get a rabbit it is tempting to get the first one you see. Unfortunately, all rabbits aren’t all bred in the same way.

Some are looked after with more care than others and are much stronger than others.

So if you’ve come across this article, then I’m figuring that you are interested in finding some good physical charaHealthy rabbitcteristics or traits of a healthy rabbit.

This is a list of five good characteristics of a healthy rabbit that you should look out for when getting a rabbit.

This will really help in the long run with your rabbit and hopefully save you money in unwanted visits to the vet.

So here you go…

1. A healthy rabbit has a good clean coat

The coat of the rabbit should be clean clean and it should have a glossy glean to it.

There should be no sign of mites.

The coat should be clean around the anus and there should be no evidence of diarrhoea.

When a rabbit has diarrhoea, it is a sign of an unbalanced diet.

2. A healthy rabbit has a good set of eyes

Rabbits should have have bright eyes, and there should be no discharge from them.

Any discharge means that a rabbit will need a visit to the vet and they could be for a number of reasons, which are helpfully explained in this article which goes into the different reasons for rabbit eye discharge.

3. A healthy rabbit has a nice damp nose

Their nose should be damp but have no discharge from it and it should not be runny.

If they have a runny nose, then they need to get to the vet as soon as possible as they are probably suffering from an infection of the upper respiratory tract, which is very common with rabbits.

4. A healthy rabbit has dry front paws

Following on from number 3, their front paws should be dry.

If they are wet or they are matted then this is a sign that the rabbit has a runny nose and is using its paws to wipe its nose using its paws.

If you can’t see any discharge from their nose, then do check their paws.

5. A healthy rabbit has a good set of even teeth

The teeth of the rabbit should not be crooked or pertrude from its mouth.

The teeth of a rabbit should meet evenly.

When you examine a young rabbit, you should see that they are pointed until your rabbit begins to gnaw things.

Once your rabbit’s teeth have been gnawed sufficiently, they will become even and should meet together evenly.

Teeth problems can occur from chewing hard objects such as the wire on cages, from an injury or it can simply be inherited.

Even so, this can be dealt with, and this is a good article here that explains more about how to deal with crooked rabbit teeth.

 

Getting a Rabbit for the First Time

5 Things to Consider When Getting a Rabbit for the First Time

Getting a rabbit for the first time can be a daunting thing. Its really hard to know what is a good rabbit or a bad rabbit, what they need, what they don’t need and how to best care for them.

The thing about rabbits is that they are known as pets that require food and clothing to be provided for them.

Rabbits are completely dependent on us for their well being and for all their needs and requirements to be catered for and subsequently understood.

With this, its really necessary to get to know a rabbit’s habits so that you can get to know when they are in distress or are sick.

Its also necessary to find time to feed, to groom as well as clean out their hutch.

There are many rabbits that have been mistreated and even abandoned because their owner underestimated what it means to look after a rabbit. However, if you are committed to looking after a rabbit, it can be such a great experience and a really rewarding thing to do.

So here are 5 Things to Consider When Getting a Rabbit for the First Time

1. The best place to get a rabbit

Rabbits can be bought from pet shops, breeders, show exhibitors, online listings and many other places.

If you want a rabbit of a very good quality standard, then going to someone who shows rabbits will give you the best standard of rabbit.

They are often the more expensive option, but showing standards are very high and the quality of the rabbit you get will be high as well.

Getting a rabbit for the first timeHowever rabbits in pet shops tend not to be of a same high standard, and the same goes for those found in online listings such as craigslist or gumtree (UK).

It’s in these listings where the cheapest rabbits can be found.

But if  you really want to do good, then go to a rescue and get a rabbit.

There are countless rabbits that have been abandoned and need a home.

Rescues do a great job of taking these rabbits in, rehabilitating them and setting them up with great new homes.

2. The best age to get a rabbit

The best age to get a rabbit is between 12 and 16 weeks old as they will be well into their development and will have got past the stage where they are suffering from ailments that are stress-related.

These ailments can really affect those rabbits that are very young.

Also younger rabbits tend to settle much better than adults do, and are much less likely to be give you problems.

3. Rabbits living Together?

Bucks and Doe’s that have both been neutered have the ability to live together well and in peace.

Doe’s have the ability to live with one another if they come from the same litter.

However, the best scenario is when Bucks and Doe’s live with the same gender.

4. The best rabbit breeds to get for a novice

If you are looking to get a rabbit then one of the best breeds to get are the Himalayan rabbit.

This is because they are small and able to be handled easily.

They are also extremely placid and don’t usually scare easily.

Another good breed for novice rabbit owners is the Dutch Rabbit which has a reputation for being very good natured and for being a rabbit that does not mind being handled.

5. Things to look for when getting a rabbit

When you are getting a rabbit it is important to be able to handle the rabbit in order to get to examine it.

Check the coat condition of the rabbit that it is clean and glossy with their health, that their are no mites that are attacking them, and that the area around their anus is clean with no evidence of diarrhoea.

Check that their eyes are bright, and they have damp noses and their paws are wet from rubbing it.

For a more detailed post on this subject, then check out this post here.

4 Ideas for a Rabbit Carrier

If you are looking to take rabbit home for the first time then there are a few ways you can do this. One of those way’s is obviously to buy a specialist rabbit carrier but if you don’t want to spend the money on one of those then there are several other ideas for rabbit carriers that you could utilise.

In all these ideas, make use of newspaper and hay to put in the carrier so that the rabbit is comfortable. It is also helpful to put some food in there so they have something to eat.

Cardboard box: As long as the cardboard box is sufficiently large enough for the rabbit to move around in then it should be fine. Make sure that the box is taped up securely and is secure on all sides. The most important thing is that they rabbit can’t fall out of the box at all.

Small plastic dog or cat carrier: If you have a cat or a dog then you could utilise a dog or cat carrier to bring your rabbit home. These should be perfectly fine for rabbits to be carried in as well. They are normally well ventilated and have room to move around in.

A Laundry basket: Some owners have said that using a laundry basket has been sufficient to carry a rabbit home. However, place a blanket over the top to ensure that it doesn’t hop out. However, the basket has enough ventilation to aid the rabbit.

Picnic hamper: Another way is to use a picnic hamper that like a laundry basket, has plenty of holes that allow for ventilation. They also have a secure fastening to ensure that the rabbit does not hop out.

With any of these ideas, it is important that the rabbit does not stay in the carrier for long and is let out into its run as soon as possible.

Make sure there are plenty of air holes if it is a sealed container and ensure that there is a lid for the container.

Keep the container sealed until you return home.

Don’t try and carry the rabbit in your arms on the journey home.

If the rabbit tries to escape, it could injure itself by falling. Ensure it is safe above all things and you will be fine.

Try and keep the temperature for the rabbit as cool as you can.

5 Ideas for a Rabbit Carrier

If you are looking to take rabbit home for the first time then there are a few ways you can do this. One of those way’s is obviously to buy a specialist rabbit carrier but if you don’t want to spend the money on one of those then there are several other ideas for rabbit carriers that you could utilise.

In all these ideas, make use of newspaper and hay to put in the carrier so that the rabbit is comfortable. It is also helpful to put some food in there so they have something to eat.

So here are 5 ideas for a rabbit carrier for you to consider.

Buy a specialist rabbit carrier: These can be purchased from any good pet shop or purchased second hand online. Just make sure it is in good condition and has sufficient air holes and space for them to feel comfortable for their trip to their new home.

Cardboard box: As long as the cardboard box is sufficiently large enough for the rabbit to move around in then it should be fine. Make sure that the box is taped up securely and is secure on all sides. The most important thing is that they rabbit can’t fall out of the box at all.

Small plastic dog or cat carrier: If you have a cat or a dog then you could utilise a dog or cat carrier to bring your rabbit home. These should be perfectly fine for rabbits to be carried in as well. They are normally well ventilated and have room to move around in.

A Laundry basket: Some owners have said that using a laundry basket has been sufficient to carry a rabbit home. However, place a blanket over the top to ensure that it doesn’t hop out. However, the basket has enough ventilation to aid the rabbit.

Picnic hamper: Another way is to use a picnic hamper that like a laundry basket, has plenty of holes that allow for ventilation. They also have a secure fastening to ensure that the rabbit does not hop out.

With any of these ideas, it is important that the rabbit does not stay in the carrier for long and is let out into its run as soon as possible.

Make sure there are plenty of air holes if it is a sealed container and ensure that there is a lid for the container.

Keep the container sealed until you return home.

Don’t try and carry the rabbit in your arms on the journey home.

If the rabbit tries to escape, it could injure itself by falling. Ensure it is safe above all things and you will be fine.

Try and keep the temperature for the rabbit as cool as you can.

bringing home a rabbit

Bringing A Rabbit Home: Setting up their home for them

In this post we’re following on from the last post about what to use when bringing a rabbit home.

We’re going to look at what the essential things are that you need for when your bring your rabbit home.
So here are the essential things you’ll need to have in place once your rabbit arrives at their new home.

Think about where you will put your cage/hutch?

Having the room to keep a rabbit is vital to ensuring your new rabbit has the best start to living in their new home.

Think about where you are going to keep your rabbit. Is it going to be kept inside or outside?

What is the rabbit used to. Some rabbit have been kept inside for all of their lives and will just not be used to being kept outside, where as others will be completely fine with being outside.

Get some good background on your rabbit and find out what they are used to before deciding that the rabbit would be a good fit for your home.

If you have any other pets in your home, think about the impact on them. It is a good idea to keep them separate in case they just don’t get on.

Get a good Rabbit hutch

Many owners make the mistake of getting a hutch that is far too small for their rabbits. In fact most pet stores sell rabbit hutches that are far too small for their rabbit.

The RWAF recommends a minimum hutch size of 6′ x 2′ x 2′, which allows rabbits some room to move, stand on their hind legs and enough space for the food, toilet and sleeping areas to be kept apart.

It is commonly accepted that a rabbit should have space for 3 hops, but it is commonly underestimated just how far 3 hops is – our tests show that 3 hops from an average sized rabbit covers 6-7 feet!

A hutch should only be a shelter and not the only living space. It should be attached to a secure run of at least 8′ x 4′.

These types of cages can be bought be very reasonably if you are prepared to look around.

Rabbit food

Stock up on some good food for your rabbit. Get in plenty of food for then as well.

Water for your Rabbit

Get a water bottle for your rabbit so that they have a constant supply of water and never get thirsty. This can be attached to the side of the cage and then refilled when it is getting low.

Hay

Rabbits always need hay to chew on so get hay for them to do this and it can also double up as bedding which they will use to snuggle into when they sleep.

A Run

Rabbits need exercise and love to run. Have a place where they can run around in.

If you have the garden to do this in, it might be worth making an enclosed area where they can run around in.

You can also purchase large grids that you can place on grass that will allow the Rabbit to run around in.

What to do when you get your Rabbit home

When you get home and you have its cage all ready to go, carefully lift the rabbit out of the carrier and give it a good cuddle.

Its important that it gets to know you and what you are like as its owner, building up the trust is important.

It may appear nervous and wriggle around but that’s perfectly normal as it will be nervous and its first instinct will be to go and hide.

After a few minutes of holding it, place the rabbit in the cage and shut the door.

Believe it or not, talking to the rabbit will help it acclimatise and get to know your voice. This is important for the rabbit in getting to know its new surroundings.

how many rabbits should I get

How Many Rabbits Should I Get?

When getting a rabbit, many people just get one rabbit and that usually suffices for them.

But should one rabbit be sufficient for an owner and is it okay for a rabbit to live alone. How many rabbits should I get?

image wikipedia

Just having one rabbit

 

The thing about just having one rabbit is that there is a danger that they will get lonely.

However, all rabbits are different and yours maybe just fine on its own.

How about getting two rabbits?

 

If you are looking to get a rabbit for the first time, then it would be better to consider getting two rabbits together especially if they are from the same family.

When you have a pair of rabbits together they will groom each other and keep each other company.

 

However it is helpful that they are already bonded as it is trickier but not impossible to bond two strangers together.

Make sure that they are either same sex pairs or if they are male and female that they are neutered otherwise you may find yourself with more rabbits than you can handle. With two rabbits make sure that you give them space to run around in.

A good hutch size according to the RSPCA measures 6 ft x 2 ft x 2ft and give them a run as well.

The More the Merrier

If you can handle any more rabbits, then they will enjoy the company of other rabbits so the more the merrier. Just make sure that you have the space for them to enjoy their home.

simple facts about rabbits

10 Simple facts About Rabbits

If you’re new to them, then here 10 simple facts about rabbits to help get you started in understanding them better.

They are an often mis-understood species however they are much loved around the world with many different breeds and varieties that are bred.

10 Simple facts about rabbits

 

1. Rabbits are from the order Lagomorpha which is the same order as hares and pikas.

They are not rodents as many people think they are.

Source animals.about.com

2. In the wild, rabbits live in wetlands, deserts, forests, woods, and meadows and live in groups called herds in underground burrows and warrens.

Source Rabbits, Pikas and dwarf rabbits

3. They are crepuslcular creatures which means that they are most active during twilight which is at dusk and dawn.

Source pets beta

4. They sleep on average 8 hours a day and will do so with their eyes open like other prey animals.

They are herbivores that feed on leaves, plants and grass and need to keep chewing in order to grind their teeth down which are constantly growing.

If they don’t do this it can be quite painful for them.

Source xiang.com

5. They are often confused with hares but the main difference between them is how their kits are born.

Rabbit kits are born without hair and blind, where as hares are born with good vision and with hair.

Hares are larger than rabbits and will live above ground in nests when they are in the wild whereas rabbits will tend to live underground.

Source St Tiggywinkles

6. There are approximately 30 species of rabbit throughout the world found in various countries.

The largest population of rabbits is found in North America.

Source bunnyhugga

7. They are a well known prey animal and will dig a number of burrows and warrens to make it difficult for predators to get to them.

In order to get away from their predators, they will run in a zigzag and can reach speeds of up to 18 miles per hour.

Source nps.gov

8. They breed at least three to four times a year and have litters of up to seven young.

Source Pantalogia

9. Rabbits have an ability to see 360 degrees can have the ability to see behind them to see for predators approaching.

The only place they can’t see is immediately in front of their nose.

Source riseandshinerabbiry

10. They are very affectionate animals that enjoy the company of other rabbits. They will groom each other in a process which is known as allogrooming where two rabbits will groom each other at the same time simultaneously.

Source wildlifeonline

what breed of rabbit should i get

What Breed of Rabbit Should I Get?

When it comes to deciding what breed of rabbit to get, there are many different options to decide from.

Depending on who is going to look after the rabbit, depends on what breed of rabbit would be suitable.

So here is brief guide to each breed to try and help you decide which one is for you.

Miniature Lops

  • The smallest of the lop-eared rabbits
  • They are easy to handle
  • They are very good natured
  • They are very good for children as first rabbits because of their size and temperament.
  • They come in a variety of colours
  • They are different to a mini lop

Lionhead

  • They are a small to medium size
  • They weigh between 1.3-1.7 kg
  • Good for older children to handle becuase of their size
  • Their build s compact and they have a well rounded body.
  • Their ears are short and upright
  • They come in a wide variety of colous
  • They are very good natured rabbits.

Netherland dwarf

  • A very popular breed of rabbit.
  • They tend to weigh between 500g to 1.6kg.
  • They have a childish appearance and are small in size.
  • If they are looked after welll and loved and cared for, they make excellent pets.
  • They can be looked after by children and adults

British giant

  • They make very good pets
  • They are very large breed rabbits.
  • The Giant rabbit can weigh between 5kg-10kg.
  • It is not suitable for children to look after because of its size

Rex

  • It is known for being able to live in outside environments.
  • They enjoy warmer weather
  • They have many different colours.
  • They have a gentle nature and a great choice of rabbit for children and adults

French lop

  • They are one of the most affectionate of all the types of rabbit breeds
  • They are large and heavy rabbits
  • They are more suited to adult carers rather than children because of their bulk and size.
  • They make great house rabbits and are very tameable.
  • They have loped ears, a chunky headset and ears that are lopped.
  • They are very docile and placid creatures.
  • They tend to weigh between 6 – 7 kg.

Dutch

  • They are very popular breed for children because of their relatively small size.
  • They re known for their white shoulders and white stripe down their nose.
  • They tend to weigh between 2-3 kg.

English angora

  • They are suited to older children or adults to look after.
  • They need more grooming care than other breeds of rabbit.
  • Their long coat is dense and woolly and needs tension a daily basis to ensure that it doesn’t mat.
  • They tend to weigh between 3-3.5 kg.

Cashmere lop

  • They come in a wide variety of colours.
  • They weigh between 1.8 to 2.3 kg
  • It has a coat that is thick and soft
  • It is a medium sized rabbit that is not recommended for younger children.

Minature lop

  • They are known as friendly rabbits who are very playful.
  • They are social animals who enjoy being with others.
  • They are small rabbits compared to other breeds and are more suitable for children than other breeds.
  • It is also known as the dwarf lop.